A Promised Land, A Perilous Journey: Theological Perspectives on Migration

A Promised Land, A Perilous Journey: Theological Perspectives on Migration

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  • Binding: Paperback
  • Publish Date: 2008-02-01


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A Christian theological interpretation of the border reality is a neglected area of immigration study. The foremost contribution of A Promised Land, A Perilous Journey is its focus on the theological dimension of migration, beginning with the humanity of the immigrant, a child of God and a bearer of his image.

The nineteen authors in this collection recognize that one characteristic of globalization is the movement not only of goods and ideas but also of people. The crossing of geographical borders confronts Christians, as well as all citizens, with choices: between national security and human insecurity; between sovereign national rights and human rights; between citizenship and discipleship. Bearing these global dimensions in mind, the essays in this book focus on the particular problems of immigration across the U.S.-Mexico border. The contributors to this volume include scholars as well as pastors and lay people involved in immigration aid work. Daniel Groody has also produced a documentary on immigration, “Dying to Live.”
 
“A Promised Land, A Perilous Journey offers a rich, interdisciplinary treatment of the subject of migration, showing the human face of contemporary migration as a global phenomenon. The authors explore historical antecedents in Biblical and early church history, the political debates about borders and the right to migrate, and the role of race, ethnicity, and gender in the ‘perilous journey’ of migrants. This is an indispensable text for all interested in the theology of migration and the ethics of migration policy.” —William O’Neill, S.J., Jesuit School of Theology, Berkeley
 
“At times saddening, at times inspiring, A Promised Land, A Perilous Journey, brings fresh perspectives to the discussion of immigration. These essays reach beyond the policy debate and the heated emotions of the moment and provide much needed reflection on larger truths.” —Roberto Suro, University of Southern California
 
 

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